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The “Hallelujah Chorus” is often associated with Christmastime. 

But it’s part of Handel’s “Messiah,” a larger piece of music conceived for Easter. It debuted in the spring holiday season in the mid 1700s, and the “Hallelujah Chorus” is all about the resurrection of Jesus. 

Easter is Sunday, and at many churches, music plays a large role in the celebration.

This week, WFPL News is exploring the sounds and melodic traditions of this spring holiday season. For Easter, another look at this well-known choral composition. 

At Christ Church United Methodist in Louisville, about 100 singers rehearse it, led by the church’s director of music ministries, Daniel Blosser.

Christ Church United Methodist director of music ministries Daniel Blosser leads the church's chancel choir through a rehearsal on April 13, 2022. Stephanie Wolf | wfpl.org

Christ Church United Methodist director of music ministries Daniel Blosser leads the church’s chancel choir through a rehearsal on April 13, 2022.

Blosser says worshipers avoid saying “alleluia” all throughout Lent as a way to honor “Christ’s suffering, Christ’s death.” 

“So there’s a great anticipation for the moment in which we get to say, ‘Alleluia,’ and sing, ‘Alleluia’ on Easter Sunday morning because it’s been so long since we’ve done that.”

He thinks music’s ephemeral nature helps people experience their faith.

“That enables us to connect with each other and have sort of a spiritual connection with God… but there’s also something very community-oriented,” Blosser says.

Stephanie Wolf is WFPL's Arts & Culture Reporter.