Politics

Kentuckians go to the polls Tuesday to choose their Democratic presidential nominee, major-party candidates for U.S. Senate and House, and nominees for multiple state House and Senate races.

In Louisville, residents will also decide a few fiercely contested Metro Council races.

Before you head out to the polls, here’s what you should know:

When and where can I vote?

Polls open at 6 a.m. local time and close at 6 p.m. You can find your polling place and check out sample ballots here.

How long will I have to stand in line?

Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes says she expects 20 percent of the state’s more than 3.2 million registered voters to cast ballots in Tuesday’s primary elections. Grimes says the absence of a Republican presidential race will likely drive down turnout on the GOP side. The state party held a presidential caucus in March, which Donald Trump won easily.

Who am I voting for?

In the federal races: Democratic Presidential Primary, Republican Senate Primary, Democratic Senate Primary, and all six Congressional Districts.

A detailed guide to the 2016 federal elections is right here.

Some notable Louisville Races

Of the 100 state House districts, 91 will have contested elections this fall. Half of the 38 state Senate seats are up for re-election as well, but only a handful of incumbent candidates have opponents.

Here’s an overview of four noteworthy legislative races where several incumbents have picked up new rivals.

Metro Council

There are contested races in Metro Council Districts 2, 4, 6, 8, 14 and 16.

Incumbents with no challengers are Pat Mulvihill, D-10; Rick Blackwell, D-12; Marilyn Parker, R-18; Stuart Benson, R-20; Robin Engel, R-22; Madonna Flood, D-24; Brent Ackerson, D-26.

A detailed guide to the 2016 Louisville primary races is right here.

In an effort to find out what residents want from their next council members, WFPL’s Jake Ryan went into the districts of the most hotly contested races and talked to citizens. You’ll find those stories here:

When will I know who won?

Statewide results should start rolling in a little after 7 p.m. Eastern, when polls in the western part of the state close. We’ll have live coverage at wfpl.org.